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The current series “INNOCENCE“ is predominantly composed of large-sized paintings from 2014 and more recent till this day. It’s a work-in progess – therefore the series will continue and new paintings and creative perspectives will be restocked.

Central topic is light: brightness as a symbol that stands for the beginning, the morning, the pureness and birth, the ease and light-heartedness. In other words: innocence. And this innocence is beautiful, perfect, immortal. This innocence is emotional, it touches and is a promise. Mostly the series works with very different yellow and red colours. We are talking about affirmative paintings as a stark contrast to the (daily) madness and confusions around us. These paintings are my answer to all the negative events in this world and it correlates with my credo from the Bible: be hot, be cold but never be lukewarm (Book of Revelation 3:16).

We have to fight against the gloom before melancholia will drown us. We should offer resistance against the inner and outer debris fields – we can be warriors of light (within the meaning of Paulo Coelho) and we are able to design our fate in an intensive and positive kind. We’re standing back to back and defending our well standpoints. We are making mistakes. But we are fighting.

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Of course there’s a drop of bitterness. Because light also creates shadows. We aren’t always able to control what we’ve started. The great Hemingway found the right words for that dilemma:

“All things truly wicked start from innocence.“    

Ernest Hemingway

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Nothing is only good. Maybe at the beginning, in the first moments of a genesis but time corrupts, relativises, besmears. We carry a dualism inside our heads. Man is wolf to man – homo homini lupus – in terms of Thomas Hobbes, and there’s always more than only one side of the coin.

We have to face the fact that the subject of innocence creates a human tendency to ideologism. The search of brightness, light and truth often becomes abnormal and arouses fanaticism. History teaches us enough examples where dark and evil doings where installed under the flag of enlightenment and best intents. Classical (I don’t want to stress modern cases because often it is too obvious but our society doesn’t want to call a spade a spade) but no singular cases: the time of the French Revolution when the true fight for equality headed for political lawsuits and the guillotine. We do remember the names: Robespierre, Danton but also Rousseau and Napoleon. Or let us bethink of the end of the Roman Republic with its protagonists Cicero, Pompeius, Crassus and the unstoppable rise of Julius Caesar.

Seemingly there is no light without shadows, no whole truth without a dictatorship of opinion. I don’t judge. How much evil doings are tolerable to let the good win? The means and the end – an age-old dilemma. Is a macchiavellistic view legitimate? I am just the annalist and keep the minutes as an expressive-abstract protocol about our incarnation and awareness raising. That thoughtful undertone acts in this series only as an intellectual pastime (mostly articulated by the painting’s title and accompanied by my poetry). It doesn’t derogate the positive prevailing mood of the painting series. But the other side of the coin is always present, this latent danger of overstatement and overreaction. A high-contrast and intensive colour palette phrases my point of view.

The unpolluted pureness, the complete good remains a longing, an objective and an illusion at the same time. We all have to stand this cognition.

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INNOCENCE

innocence – blame
birth – life
sea – ebb and flow
light – shadows
creed – rationality
miracle – words
beauty – maturity
enlightenment – disinterest
eternity – death
freedom – moral
rise – ruin
sun – clouds
pureness – routine
gods – god, yours, mine, not anybody
truth – demand of truth, yours, mine, not anybody

INNOCENCE – PERSONHOOD

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